ROONEY SAYS PSE&G NEEDS TO RECONSIDER SALE OF BERGEN POWER PLANT CAPACITY TO NEW YORK

ROONEY SAYS PSE&G NEEDS TO RECONSIDER SALE OF BERGEN POWER PLANT CAPACITY TO NEW YORK

SUGGESTS UTILIZING HUDSON FACILITY, WHILE KEEPING BERGEN PLANT FOR EXCESS CAPACITY IN STATE

Assemblyman John Rooney today called on officials with Public Service Electric & Gas (PSE&G) to reconsider their plans to sell off the entire capacity of their Bergen II power plant to New York City, a move that would require the use of 660,000 volt transmission lines stretched several miles across Bergen and Hudson counties.

“This plan not only has negative environmental impacts, but it also will diminish property values in the areas where these high-voltage transmission lines will run,” said Rooney, R-Bergen. “If we are going to upgrade the Jersey City generating facility anyway to deal with our need for excess capacity at peak times, it would make more sense to use that facility to generate the power PSE&G wants to sell to New York.

“If they use the Hudson I facility, the lines can be run right under the Hudson River into New York instead of requiring new high voltage power lines stretching across both Bergen and Hudson counties.”

Currently, the Bergen II power plant in Ridgefield operates on average at 40 percent capacity. The plant essentially picks up the state’s excess capacity during peak usage times, but PSE&G is proposing to sell off the plant’s entire capacity to New York City.

In order to pick up the slack for additional capacity, PSE&G is proposing to upgrade its Hudson I plant in Jersey City – a plant that had been scheduled to be deactivated. They also propose constructing a new Bergen power facility at the same location as Bergen II. The PSE&G plan is opposed by the Board of Public Utilities, Public Advocate and the operators of the PJM power grid.

“This plan may boost PSE&G revenues, but it will be harmful to the residents of Bergen and Hudson counties,” said Rooney. “In light of the overwhelming opposition, I think this plan needs to be reconsidered.”

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