Demonstrators held candlelight vigil in support of letting Bush tax cuts expire

Demonstrators in support of letting the Bush era tax cuts on top earners expire took part in candlelight vigils outside of six congressional offices earlier this week.

The events, organized by local labor unions and Democratic grassroots groups, were aimed at drumming up support for allowing the tax cuts to expire. Allowing the tax cut for some of the nation’s top earners to lapse would benefit the country’s middle class, organizers argued.

“Our elected officials need to listen to the voices of their constituents and put the needs of the middle-class and working families first,” said Ann Vardeman, of NJ Citizen Action and Americans for Tax Fairness, in a statement.

The events were organized by the Communications Workers of America District 1, BlueWave NJ, New Jersey Citizen Action, Grassroots4Change and Organizing for America.

“This election was all about fairness, and letting the Bush tax cuts expire on the top 2 percent is a strong way to help bring about an America where everyone pays their fair share and has equal responsibility to our communities,” stated Jackie Cornell-Bechelli, campaign director for The Action and former New Jersey Obama for America state director.

“That’s why we saw such a positive response this weekend and that’s why we will continue to push Congress to do the right thing,” she said.

The vigils were held outside of offices of U.S. Reps. Jon Runyan, Frank LoBiondo, Chris Smith, Leonard Lance and Rodney Frelinghuysen.

“During this busy holiday season, over 45 people came out in the rain to the Mount Laurel vigil alone because they feel strongly that Congress shouldn’t hold the middle-class captive just to make sure the Scrooge McDucks of the world can continue swimming around in ever-deepening vaults of cash,” said Joshua Henne, New Jersey spokesman for The Action. “That’s something Congressman Runyan and the rest of the delegation should take notice of in making the decision to let the Bush Tax Cuts expire for the top 2 percent.”

"The governor still has to come to bat."
—Atlantic County Executive Dennis Levinson, on Atlantic City.